WILLWORK WORKERS TAKE ON THE ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE; ALSO DISCUSSED HERE IS THE CONNECTION OF A GREAT PUBLIC SERVANT, WHOSE NAME IS ICONIC IN THE TRADESHOW AND EVENTS INDUSTRY, TO ALS

On August 22, workers from Willwork, Inc. Exhibit & Event Services and Teamwork Labor Services, Inc. – companies whose corporate headquarters are located in the same commercial building in metropolitan Boston, joined forces to take on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge – the worldwide and immensely successful phenomenon that is raising money to support the effort to find a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Click here to view the video.

Of course, as is the standard protocol and procedure with the challenge, prior to members from Willwork and Teamwork taking on the frigid baths, they called out peers of theirs in the tradeshow, events, and installation industries to take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

Here are some facts about ALS that have been taken from the ALS Association website:

·         Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), more commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that attacks nerve cells and pathways in the brain and spinal cord. When these cells die, voluntary muscle control and movement dies with them. Patients in the later stages of the disease are totally paralyzed, yet in most cases, their minds remain sharp and alert.

·         Every day, an average of 15 people are newly diagnosed with ALS — more than 5,600 people per year. As many as 30,000 Americans may currently be affected by ALS. Annually, ALS is responsible for two deaths per 100,000 people.

·         The average life expectancy of a person with ALS is two to five years from time of diagnosis. With recent advances in research and improved medical care, many patients are living longer, more productive lives. Half of all those affected live at least three years or more after diagnosis. About 20 percent live five years or more, and up to ten percent will survive more than ten years.

·         ALS occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic boundaries. ALS can strike anyone. Every single American is threatened by this disease.

U.S. SEN. JACOB K. JAVITS and ALS

Those who work in the tradeshow and events industry know well the name “Javits” – as in the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center – more commonly called “The Javits Center” or “The Javits.”

Born in 1904 in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, Jacob K. Javits grew up to become a successful lawyer before serving in the U.S. Army in World War II. In 1946, he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from New York’s 21st District.

Rep. Javits was elected as U.S. senator from New York in 1956. Sen. Javits would serve in the U.S. senate for 24 years.

Sen. Javits was diagnosed with ALS in 1979 while serving his fourth term as senator. This diagnosis, which Sen. Javits made public, led to a primary challenge for his seat in the 1980 election, which Sen. Javits lost.

Jacob Javits, highly admired, served with distinction in the U.S. Congress for 34 years.

Sen. Jacob K. Javits died from ALS on March 7, 1986. He was 81 years old.