Willwork, Inc. Exhibit & Event Services Heralds the Ennobling Power of the Love of Mothers, and their Role as Foundation and Nurturer of the Best of this World and Humanity

Mommy cheetah and her cub (image credit: Desktop Nexus)

 

“Mama was my greatest teacher, a teacher of compassion, love and fearlessness. If love is sweet as a flower, then my mother is that sweet flower of love.”

STEVIE WONDER

“Any mother could perform the jobs of several air traffic controllers with ease.”

LISA ALTHER

Almost every great achievement and endeavor, every extraordinary accomplishment, is owed in some way – and in most cases in a major way – to the influence and love and guiding hand of a mother.

For sure, owed considerably to the success of Willwork, Inc. Exhibit & Event Services is the work and giving and guidance of so many mothers whose influence was integral in bringing up exceptional people with strong virtues who now do exceptional work for our company.

It needs to be noted here that Willwork president William F. Nixon and his wife, Helen, married for 52 years until Helen’s passing in 2007, had eight children.  And, indeed, Helen Nixon was known for her strength, devotion to family, and amazing ability to budget the salary of her husband – who, during the formative years of the children, worked as a public high school teacher and coach – so that all the kids (six girls and two boys) wanted for nothing.

Every day should be Mother’s Day, of course, but it is wholly proper and good and appropriate that yearly a day is dedicated to honoring and thanking and doing something especially nice for mom.

Mother’s Day in the U.S. has been with us for a little more than a century now.

In the entry on Mother’s Day at the HISTORY website, we learn that “the American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914.”

And we are also informed in the entry that “Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar.”

Now, we hear and can empathize with the lament of Anna Jarvis – and we know that commercialization of Mother’s Day, and other holidays, is overdone.  But in that Willwork does a considerable amount of work with and for the hospitality industry, we suggest and we submit that taking mom out for dinner, and perhaps to a show or concert, or on a local tour, or maybe even on a trip to a place far away … and also purchasing for mom flowers and other gifts … can be done in a manner that is measured and balanced and wholesome, and which is a healthy extension of true love and devotion.

Then, again, a bit of lavish spending on mom can be totally in order.  Provided, of course, that the purchase of “things” radiates from that true love and devotion, and that it doesn’t put the buyer in financial straits.

Still, and this will always be the case, the most valuable gifts are not bought in stores, as moms around the world explain every day with their actions

All too often, though, sons and daughters don’t appreciate and recognize just how much mothers give to, and do for, them.  Sometimes, Mom’s children don’t appreciate and understand all that Mom has done for them until she is gone.  Sadly, there are those children who never comprehend what Mom gave and the effort she expended to make their lives better.

All-star motivational speaker Mark Mero is a former professional wrestler and amateur boxer who, in earlier days, lived an unhealthy life, associating with the wrong people and boozing and drugging.  A primary reason that the bad influences did not destroy him is because he had a mother who always looked out for him, and who never gave up on him.

Please click here to be taken to a video of Mark Mero delivering a powerful and moving talk to young people in which he honors his mother, and in which he discusses that it was not until the immediate aftermath of her sudden death that he gained a much fuller and insightful recognition of the positive and enduring influence she served in his life.

The mothering and maternal instinct compels exceptional women to not only take care of their biological children, but the biological and noble impulse compels them to take care and watch over all children, and to work to make better the lives of all young people.

Irene Sendler, mother of two, savior of 2500 children (image credit: People’s Republic of Poland)

Irene Sendler, a Polish Catholic woman, and mother of two, during World War II served in the Polish Underground, and risked her life over and over in leading an effort that smuggled 2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto, saving the children from transport to the Nazi concentration and extermination camps.  Sendler was arrested by the Nazis, who tortured her to extract the identities and hiding places of children she had saved.  Sendler refused to divulge the information.  She was sentenced to death, but was saved on the day the sentence was to be carried out when, a German officer, bribed by a Polish citizens group, allowed her to escape.  After the escape, Sendler continued her rescue efforts.  Irene Sendler died in 2008 at the age of 98.

Josephine Baker is best known as a pioneer for black entertainers and an icon of the Jazz Age.  Born in St. Louis in 1906, she achieved stardom as dancer in Paris during the 1920s.  In 1934, Baker became the first person of color to star in a major motion picture (Zouzou), which cemented her status as the first person of color to achieve international renown as an entertainer.  Soon after Baker married French industrialist Jean Lyon in 1937, she became a citizen of France.  Baker assisted the French Resistance during World War II.  After the war, and into the 1960s, Baker traveled to the U.S. where she refused to perform for segregated audiences, and contributed to and took a prominent role in the Civil Rights Movement. Baker adopted 12 children whom represented a diversity of ethnicities and religions, and collectively which she called “The Rainbow Tribe.”

Josephine Baker, in 1959, with members of the Rainbow Tribe. At right is Baker’s husband Joe Bouillon (image credit: St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter fantasy novel series, the best-selling book series in history, wrote the first Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, while a single mother of a young daughter, and suffering from depression and receiving public assistance. Rowling, now mother of three, has said, “I am prouder of my years as a single mother than any other part of my life.”  Her days as a single mother motivate her.  Among Rowling’s philanthropic causes is serving as president of Gingerbread, an organization that provides support, education, and is an advocate for single-parent families.

Motherhood is not an obligation and a duty that only we humans respect and observe.  Across the animal kingdom, mothers will do all for their children.

Please click here to be taken to a video which is a compilation of remarkable and sometimes courageous conduct of mommy animals in the protection and care of their young   The video was created, for Mother’s Day 2017, by The Dodo, a company that develops and produces a treasure of excellent and fun media for animal lovers, and also advocates for animal welfare.  Clicking here will take you to The Dodo YouTube channel.

Willwork hopes you have enjoyed and found interesting this honoring of, and tribute to, mothers and their vital role and work in improving and keeping healthy society and civilization.

To All Mothers out there – whether human or of another life form – Willwork, Inc. Exhibit & Event Services wishes you the Happiest of Mother’s Days!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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