Of Santa’s Elves and Good Business Practices and Getting Things Done

Santa Claus and Elves in Santa’s Workshop
(image credit: Heritage Puzzle Company)

Willwork, Inc. Exhibit & Event Services, founded in 1987, is a national leader in exhibition services and event project management.

It is our privilege to work for, and provide services to, successful and innovative businesses that range in size, operational scope, and renown– from major multinationals with hundreds of thousands of employees … to small businesses, with fewer than 10 employees, and which primarily provide products or services to the local community.

And every Willwork client receives the same uncompromising excellence in service and responsiveness.

Willwork likes to use its social media network, and other communications vehicles, to express admiration for … and tout and herald … standout achievement in performance across all sectors of life – whether business, military and defense, sports, the arts, education, spiritual life, politics … you name it.

Willwork commits considerable time and resources to employee training and education – and we enlist and apply in our business the winning strategies and tactics we have observed working across many different segments of industry and society.

Observing and listening, asking questions, studying, and analyzing … helps us to learn what to do – and what not to do.

Here we are, now, in the first week of December, and in the home stretch and approaching “game time” are the efforts – ongoing for almost the entire year now – of an organization from which Willwork, and all businesses, can obtain value and benefit in studying.

We are talking about that amazing enterprise located at the North Pole: Santa’s Workshop, where elves, under the direction of Santa Claus, build and put together and fasten toys and other presents.

On Christmas Eve and into Christmas morning, the presents will be transported to good boys and girls around the world.  Providing the transport will be Santa Claus and his sleigh pulled by eight flying reindeer; their names are Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner and Blitzen

Sometimes the pulling team has nine reindeer.  You see, on the occasion of particularly bad weather, added to the team is a special reindeer – his name is Rudolph –  who possesses a nose that emits a powerful flood of red light that cuts through rain, fog, and snow … or any combination thereof … and illuminates the path ahead.

Just an incredibly efficient system of production, organization, and logistics.

Santa and his elves and flying reindeer have been performing like Amazon, FedEx, and UPS for centuries.

As for the elves.  In today’s post, we are featuring and giving major love and props to the elves. We are making sure that the elves receive the acclaim that they have earned.

Santa Claus approves.  Believe us.

And, for sure, Santa Claus cares deeply about his elves – and the entire workshop operation.

Consider this excerpt from a post, “Protecting Santa’s Elves,” published on December 5, 2013 in Risk Conversation, a blog of the global property and casualty insurance giant Chubb:

“Santa is serious about risk management and has assigned one of his elves the task of safety director. The safety director has developed a regular inspection program to insure that all the elves are wearing proper hearing protection, that all walkways and parking lots are properly cleared of snow, and that the workshop meets all the North Poles fire codes.”

Santa Claus is thorough about risk management.  For example, as also explained in the “Protecting Santa’s Elves” post:  “When elves are on the road, Santa has foreign voluntary workers compensation to help compensate the elves if they are injured or become ill during their work abroad.”

Smart and accomplished business minds recognize the winning practices of Santa – and his elves.

Among those business minds is Dr. Philip R. Geist, Area Director for the Small Business Development Center at the University of North Florida (SBDC), and an international business management consultant who has advised Fortune 500 companies.

Dr. Geist writes a blog called Speaking of Business, for OCALA.com.   On December 18, 2017, the post, “Santa and the Elves,” was published at the Speaking of Business blog.

“No, it’s not a new rock group,” writes Dr. Geist.  “Santa and the Elves are successful entrepreneurs who employ good management practices to have an effective business model. Let’s take a closer look at some of those practices.”

Here’s what Dr. Geist has to say about Santa and his elves and intellectual property:

“Santa and the Elves have several trade secrets, as closely held as the Coca-Cola recipe.  These include the ability to deliver world-wide in one night, and the ability to enter buildings unseen to deliver presents whether a chimney is present or not. By keeping these as trade secrets, Santa and the Elves have no competition. Your business must protect those intellectual property assets that make it unique, either by copyright, trademark, patent, or trade secret. In many businesses their intellectual property is the largest asset, protecting it will limit or eliminate competition.”

 Santa’s elves have long been hip and totally up-to-date on smartly using best-in-class technology to make processes more efficient and productive.

Matthew Anderson, a veteran technical solutions professional, wrote about his business trip to the North Pole and a meeting he had with Santa’s Chief of Elf Operations (CEO).

Mr. Anderson now works for Microsoft.  But it was two years ago, when he was in the  employ of Hitachi Solutions, that he wrote a post for a Hitachi blog about how Santa’s CEO was using the business management software Dynamics 365, a Microsoft product.  (As is the case today, Hitachi and Microsoft are strategic business partners.)

Here is the first paragraph of Mr. Anderson’s post, “Dynamics 365 Lets Elves Visualize and Automate their North Pole Processes”:

“I travel a lot in my role at Hitachi Solutions. During a recent visit to the North Pole, I checked in with Santa’s CEO (Chief of Elf Operations) to catch up. While she is under NDA and couldn’t disclose anything from Santa’s naughty/nice list, I was able to get some feedback on how her team uses the new visual process editor in Dynamics 365 to keep things running smoothly in the workshop. Why is she so excited?”

To find out why the Chief of Elf Operations was so excited please click here to be taken to the full post (which gets a bit technical).

Perhaps the most important aspect and element that supports the elves business success is that they like what they do, and that they work in a supportive and happy environment and culture.

All businesses can benefit from happy employees.

That is the contention Susan M. Heathfield, a management consultant  specializing in human resources and management development, who is frequently quoted in business media stories. Among the outlets that have quoted Ms. Heathfield are The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and Forbes.

Ms. Heathfield wrote a post, “Happy Employees Are More Productive in an Elf-Friendly Workplace,” that was published on December 15 of last year on the blog of the award-winning and popular career website, The Balance Careers, for which she writes regularly.

“Workplaces that emulate Santa’s workshop resonate with excitement, engagement, positive employee morale, and employee motivation,” writes Ms. Heathfield.  “Happy employees are more productive, too.”

The subtitle of Ms. Heathfield’s post is “10 Reasons Why Employees Are Happy and Engaged in an Elf-Friendly Workplace.”

If you click here you will be taken to the complete post where you can read up on those 10 reasons.

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Happy and productive as Santa’s Elves.

Willwork submits that this is a preferred way to live – and a preferred way to work and do business.

Happy Holidays!!

 

 

 

 

Into the Holiday Season … of Santa’s Elves and Good Business Practices and Getting Things Done

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